Bremen History

From the 1st century onwards, there were settlements at the Weser River in North Germany where Bremen is now.

The official foundation date of Bremen, however, was in the 8th century.

Charlemagne appointed the city a diocesan town in 787 and in 845, it became an archbishopric which caused the first flourishing of the city.

In 1260, Bremen became member of the Hanse, an important league of trading cities in North Germany and an independent city.

During this period, the landmark of Bremen – the statue of the Roland – as well as the city hall were built in order to demonstrate the city’s independence.

During this period, the landmark of Bremen – the statue of the Roland – as well as the city hall were built in order to demonstrate the city’s independence.

Because the Weser increasingly started silting up, a new part of Bremen was constructed at the western banks of the Weser River between 1574 and 1590. The aggradation also caused problems for merchant ships to land at the docks and Germany’s first artifical harbour was built at the beginning of the 17th century. Bremen was appointed Free Imperial City.

From 1811 to 1814, Bremen was occupied by Napoleon’s troups. In the 19th century as well, the city plaid an important role in the development of the German overseas trade and shipping companies were founded.

Due to the flourishing economy, Bremen’s population increased considerably.

During the Second World War, Bremen was destroyed to a large extent. In 1947, it got a constitution and two years later, it became a land of the Federal Republic of Germany.

In 2004, the old city hall as well as the Roland statue at the Marktplatz were appointed UNESCO World Heritage.